The Orange

The Orange is named after Prince William of Orange (1792-1849). Prince William was given command of the Allied I Corps at Waterloo even though he was only in his twenties. Unfortunately, his inexperience got the best of him and his enemies’ commanders were able to deplete his troops rather quickly, resulting in an ultimate loss for his side. Much like Prince William, the Orange House are the underdogs, but as we proved towards the end of last year we are capable of great things and we are keen to turn that second place finish into a first!

This year our Head of Orange is Josh. Joining him on the student council is Scarlett, ChaeRin and Leo. This year the students in Orange house are focusing on putting effort into everything they do at school and are eagerly awaiting our chance to defend our title as the house debate champions.

David MacKinnon
Orange Housemaster

The house team consists of 6 teachers: Maja Rogic looks after Year 13/CSF3, Mark Service is the tutor of Year 12/CSF2, David MacKinnon is the Year 10/11/CSF1 tutor, Ed Batey is the Year 9 tutor, Stacey Liu is the year 8 tutor and Ian Gallagher takes care of the year 7s. We are also lucky enough to have Ross McGrath as an official Orange house staff member as well.
This Orange is named after Prince William of Orange (1792 – 1849). Prince William spent most of his early life in exile, until 1813 when the throne of the Netherlands was restored to his father. He attended military college in Berlin and London and served for a short time as ADC to Wellington on the Peninsula. His new status in 1815 meant that he was given command of the Allied I Corps at Waterloo. His bravery was never in question; however his inexperience in battle led him to make gross mistakes. A detachment of French cavalry destroyed a large part of the force under Prince William, who had sent infantry into an area they were not needed despite warnings about the presence of cavalry, and later sacrificed two battalions to the French cavalry by ordering them to advance in a line. Considering he was still in his early twenties and trying to hold his own with battle hardened commanders it is probably not surprising that his efforts were unsuccessful. He was hit by a cannonball and taken from the battlefield of Waterloo injured.